‘The Tontine Society’ of Glasgow was formed in 1782. School of Humanities | Sgoil nan Daonnachdan. In the 19th century, Glasgow’s connection to slavery was obscured. The Glasgow Building Preservation Trust purchased the building in 1993 and embarked on an ambitious programme of redevelopment to create Glasgow’s Centre for Scottish Culture. Glasgow, Scotland – When abolitionist Frederick Douglass arrived in Scotland on a speaking tour in 1846 from the United States, 13 years had … The tour tries to use the statues to demonstrate that it’s not just a question of individual slave-traders, but that slavery and abolition are woven through George Square’s public memory of commerce, politics, science, militarism, industrialisation, academia and literature. The building, one of the most important in the city, demonstrated the important link between the colonial trade in tobacco and sugar and Glasgow’s continuing economic growth in the nineteenth century. The City Chambers is one of most impressive buildings in Scotland. Blog by Jack Tannock, media volunteer at Scottish Refugee Council. The venue helps illustrate Glasgow’s truly international contribution to universal emancipation. An Act of Parliament in 1768 suggested the cost was met by the magistrates and council. Francis Hutcheson (1694-1746) studied there and his lectures, after he was appointed Professor of Moral Philosophy in 1729, provided a moral critique of slavery, which inspired abolitionists on a global scale. Many streets we know well, such as Ingram and Buchanan, bear the name of slavers. Glassford’s main business was the Virginia trade in tobacco, an industry built on slave labour and this was where he made and lost most of his fortune. Described as ‘one of the most splendid houses in the west of Scotland’, it stood in stark contrast to the semi-rural conditions that prevailed close to the centre of Glasgow. The Virginia Galleries, in Virginia Street, sat at the centre of what was once the commercial heart of Glasgow. Glasgow University, originally situated in the heart of the city on High Street, played an active part in campaigning against slavery. Ramsay is also a co-lead on Black History Month walking tours commissioned by Coalition for Racial Equality and Rights, highlighting the historical links between Glasgow’s built heritage and the transatlantic slave trade and chattel slavery, empire and colonisation. In 1836 he supported the petition of 30,000 residents of the city to end the apprenticeship scheme in the West Indies that had continued a form of slavery after its formal abolition by Parliament in 1834. Glasgow Anti-Slavery Group. ‘The Old Sugar House’ was built in 1699 and named ‘Easter Sugar House’ to distinguish it from another sugar refinery nearby. GLASGOW.- Glasgow Life, the charity that manages the city’s museums and collections, has appointed Miles Greenwood as its first Curator focussing on the legacies of slavery and empire, to continue to tell the story of the impact the transatlantic trade in enslaved Africans and the British Empire has had on Glasgow. Nonetheless, he became active in the campaign for global emancipation after the Emancipation Act of 1833. Glasgow, Scotland – When abolitionist Frederick Douglass arrived in Scotland on a speaking tour in 1846 from the United States, 13 years had passed since Britain enacted the Slavery Abolition Act. This tour of Glasgow’s City Centre and Merchant City tells a story of the built heritage, the tobacco merchants’ legacy and the Slave Trade and its abolition. To listen to audio for each stop on the tour, please click here . Author Stephen Millar takes a walking tour of Glasgow to examine the city's links to the international slave trade By The Newsroom Wednesday, 26th December 2018, 4:19 pm Always recruiting volunteers please get in touch. It helped fund his education, after many universities in the USA had rejected him, demonstrating Glasgow University’s long and honourable history as a place of learning for the disenfranchised and the dispossessed. Maiyah Gamble-Rivers trudged through the snow one recent afternoon to get to a highlight on the Slavery & Legacy walking tour at Brown University. The Galleries, built from 1817 until 1819, were originally the Tobacco Exchange, and later the Sugar Exchange. The building was modelled on St Martin-In-The-Fields in London. ALL 12 of the statues of scientists, soldiers, writers, politicians and royals in George Square in Glasgow have a variety of connections to slavery and abolition. Discover Loch Ness, the Isle of Skye, and the Scottish Highlands on a 3-day tour from Glasgow or Edinburgh, with convenient round-trip transfer by air-conditioned coach. A variety of merchants built townhouses there. Oswald, who came from a merchant family which had been deeply involved in the tobacco and sugar trades since the 1730s, served as a Glasgow MP from the time of the 1832 Reform Act. Since 2007, Stephen Mullen, historian and author of ‘ It Wisnae Us: The Truth About Glasgow and Slavery ’, has studied Glasgow’s mercantile past, with particular focus on the city’s connections to slave trading within the Empire. The same society hired a series of American black abolitionist lecturers before and after Harriet’s visit, Those before included J.W. Andrew Buchanan purchased the land now known as Buchanan Street in 1760, and lived there for a number of years. Richard Oswald and Co. applied to the town council in 1756 regarding the purchase of land surrounding their bottle works at the Broomielaw, which had been operating since 1730. There are 19 recorded slave voyages which left from Glasgow’s satellite ports of Greenock and Port Glasgow over a sixty year period from 1706 and 1766 - with these direct voyages … He spent £10,000, a huge sum, on his townhouse. The Shawfield Mansion at the bottom of modern day Glassford Street faced onto Argyle Street. This week Scottish Refugee Council is hosting its first-ever event at which refugees and asylum…. Yet like other major ports on the Atlantic seaboard such as Bristol and Liverpool, much of the city’s early wealth was built on a global trade which ran on slave labour. The Broomielaw was used as a dock to land tobacco and sugar from the larger ports at Greenock and Port Glasgow and the new street became an important thoroughfare on the way to many Glasgow warehouses. Michael Morris: Confronting Scotland's legacy of slavery. Cunninghame had interests in both the Virginia tobacco trade and the West Indies sugar trade. David Livingstone (1813-73) attended his lectures on slavery and he hosted various abolitionists in Glasgow such as William Lloyd Garrison (1805-79) and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-96). The street was also the location of the later Town Hall and the Tontine rooms, which in the 1780s became the social and commercial headquarters of Glasgow, at a time when this area was fashionable and affluent. The City Halls became the first performance venue for the public in Glasgow, a focus for events ranging from concerts to rallies and anti-slavery meetings. The tour then led us to the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) and St Andrews in the Square Church revealing a past that I never knew about. Ewing’s father, also James Ewing, owned the largest sugar plantation in Jamaica. Video, 00:01:47 Glasgow's slave trade past is all around us In 1778 the courts took the monumental step of banning slavery in Scotland prompted by Joseph Knight – a household servant in Scotland who ran away and when caught attempted to prove his freedom. Glasgow Anti-Slavery Group. It is a counterpart to the National Memorial to Peace and Justice, which […] The Tobacco Lords were said to stroll around the Tontine Piazza, resplendent in their scarlet cloaks and gold tipped canes. The court ruling was unexpected but hugely symbolic. Wardlaw’s sermons and speeches about the evils of slavery were not always popular because of Glasgow’s longstanding connections with the West Indies and led to a decline in membership of his church and attacks in the press. As well as a legacy here in Glasgow there are reminders of Scotland’s part in slavery in many former colonies. 454 likes. A variety of prominent merchants were buried there, including two Tobacco Lords, John Glassford (1715-83) and Andrew Buchanan (1690-1759), one of the founders of The Ship Bank, Glasgow’s first bank. The building was restored as offices by Glasgow Building Preservation Trust in 1995. The globe, with a sailing ship, flanked by two female figures, which adorns the top storey of the building wascopied from the original Merchant’s Steeple (1665) near the Trongate. After escaping slavery in 1838 by going to New York, he became a brilliant orator and tireless freedom fighter alongside members of his family. is represented by the memorial to the Rev. Instead, we pride ourselves on letting you discover Scotland's cities and towns through a local's eyes. It was not an area for Glasgow citizens of a lower social scale. Sadly the building was demolished in 2003. The memorial – a … As a consequence there are few objects that directly relate to slavery … Glasgow Necropolis was modelled on Pere-Lachaise in Paris and has been described as one of the true marvels of historic Glasgow. Jamaica Street, named after the largest slave plantation island in the Caribbean, was opened in 1763 at the height of Glasgow’s rum and sugar trade. Earlier this year, Glasgow Life appointed its first curator to look specifically at the legacies of slavery and the British Empire. In 1996 the building entered The Church of St Andrews in the Square was constructed from 1739 to 1756, at a cost of £15,000 to £20,000, a huge sum. The Slavery, Abolition and the University of Glasgow report was co-authored by Prof Simon Newman and Dr Stephen Mullen, and examined the … Cunninghame purchased three plots in what is now Queen Street but was then Cow Loan, a country track. Theatrical walking tour to explore the legacy of Glasgow’s radical women. Buchanan Street, arguably the most potent symbol of modern Glasgow’s image as a cosmopolitan city, is named after the Tobacco Lord, Andrew Buchanan (1725-1783). By Brian Ferguson Friday, 22nd January 2021, 3:50 pm There are also memorials to Sir James Stirling of Keir (1740-1805), who owned plantations and slaves in Jamaica, and to Andrew Cochrane (1692-1777), a Virginia Don, who owned the King Street Sugarhouse and was six times Lord Provost of the city. I conduct a walking tour of the statues that tries to use the statues to demonstrate that it’s not just a question of individual slave traders, but that slavery and abolition are … The Trongate contained a paved area known as the ‘plainstanes’, where the Tobacco Lords liked to convene. Edinburgh, like Glasgow, Dublin, Bristol, and Clifton, were strong supporters of Garrison's proposal, whilst other groups favoured a managed move away from slavery. The illustrated walking tour A new walking tour exploring Glasgow’s links to the Transatlantic slave trade has been launched as part of this year’s Doors Open Day Festival. It fast became the centre of commercial life in Glasgow, trading in commodities such as coal, iron, cotton, sugar and chemicals. These rooms, which included a hotel, coffee room and assembly hall, became the social and commercial headquarters of Glasgow at a time when this area was fashionable and affluent. They are both buried at Glasgow Cathedral, testimony to their position in society and their loyalty to the government during the Jacobite rebellion in 1745-6. A number of sugar traders, refineries and shops in Glasgow were dependent on this trade. ... A NEW dramatic tour through Glasgow’s streets is set to remember the lives of the city’s radical women leaders. In 1807, the slave trade in British Colonies became illegal and British ships were no longer allowed to carry slaves. Virginia Street and ‘The Virginia Mansion’, which was situated on the site of the modern-day Corinthian in Ingram Street, were a testament to the wealth and influence of successive generations of the same Glasgow merchant family. Ralph Wardlaw who became one of the leading slavery emancipationists in Britain after 1833. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it. He began to lay out a new street called Virginia Street in 1753, although he died before his son, George Buchanan of Mount Vernon (1728-62), built the opulent mansion. Completed in 1890 its grandeur reflects what was then the most powerful empire in the world. This five-storey, crow-stepped gabled, building was owned by Robert McNair (1703-79) and his wife, Jean Holmes (b 1703) who were prominent shopkeepers in eighteenth century Glasgow. Over half a million people signed the welcoming address to her lecture tour of Great Britain. Our tour begins at Glasgow Cathedral where some 18th century mercantile families sought to immortalise themselves in stained glass windows and tombs. Glasgow’s Glassford Street (after the Glassford family) and Virginia Street (after the American Colony where many plantations were) are a legacy of this dark chapter. a third major phase of its history, as the Gallery of Modern Art. His granite sarcophagus in the Necropolis was sculpted by John Mossman, the pre- eminent Glasgow sculptor of the age. Neil Jamieson, Glassford’s factor, was also involved in the slave trade to the Carolinas. ALL 12 of the statues of scientists, soldiers, writers, politicians and royals in George Square in Glasgow have a variety of connections to slavery and abolition. Maiyah Gamble-Rivers created the Slavery & Legacy tour for the Center for the Study of Slavery & Justice at Brown University that includes a stop at the Slavery … The University of Glasgow is a registered Scottish charity: Registration Number SC004401. I’m Dr. Peggy Brunache, historian and archaeologist of Atlantic slavery. Various prominent Glasgow merchants were amongst the original subscribers to what was, in effect, the forerunner of the later Royal Exchange. Many merchants were buried there. The Cunninghame Mansion, now at the core of the Gallery of Modern Art, in Royal Exchange Square, was built for William Cunninghame of Lainshaw (d.1789), one of Glasgow’s most prominent eighteenth century merchants. Both the tobacco trade and the West Indian sugar trade, in which the family also had interests depended on slave labour. This became, with Virginia Street, one of the most fashionable and expensive places to live in Glasgow. GoMA was originally the mansion of the Cunningham family while St Andrews in the Square was built by Tobacco lords as their place of worship, but also a display of their wealth and power. Amongst their wares were refined and expensive sugar products such as candies, syrup and treacle. In 1778 the courts took the monumental step of banning slavery in Scotland prompted by Joseph Knight – a household servant in Scotland who ran away and when caught attempted to prove his freedom. We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. This tour is presented as part of a series of three tours, the Warm Welcome Walks 2020, organised by the UNESCO Chair in Refugee Integration through Languages and the Arts at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. By contrast Glasgow’s position as a leading abolitionist city is symbolised by the statue of James Oswald (1785-1853) in George Square. From there, cargoes would go to English and European markets, particularly France. After the publication of his 1845 autobiography, ‘Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave’, he lived in Edinburgh in 1846-7 while he made a speaking tour … Always recruiting volunteers please get in touch. The legacy of the extraordinary wealth that Glasgow accumulated on the back of enslaved labour is woven into the city’s physical environment and material culture. Alexander was the chapel’s first patron. Constructed at a cost of £10,000 for the Congregational Church and capable of holding 1,600 people, its first pastor was the Rev. Created by … Even though slavery had been judged illegal in Britain, the slave trade system was … Miller Street was named after John Miller of Westerton, a land speculator who first laid out the street in plots in the 1750s. To view the Slavery & Legacy Walking Tour website, please click here. Local academic Stephen Mullen has been uncovering some of these darker aspects by hosting a series of Sunday walking tours around Glasgow during October for Black History Month. It also helped bankrupt the brothers, who are located under the pavement in Ingram Street, the place marked by the initials RF & AF. Slavery shaped modern Britain and we live with the memory of slavery today. Its importance in the road to emancipation is demonstrated by the career of James McCune Smith (1813-65), who became the first African American to graduate MD anywhere and was also the first to practise medicine in the USA. This history includes the enslavement of African-Americans, racial lynchings, segregation, and racial bias. The Glasgow Emancipation Society started the Uncle Tom Offering, which was introduced to make up royalties Beecher Stowe could not receive in Britain. The Tontine rooms, were located in what is now the Trongate. He also served as Lord Provost, Lord Dean of Guild and was an M.P. The first tenement in the area was built in 1774. Its is a striking symbol of Victorian Glasgow’s claim to be the second city of the Empire. The burial plot of Andrew Buchanan (1725-83), after whom Buchanan Street His successor, Adam Smith (1723-90), attacked slavery on economic and moral grounds as the ‘vilest of all states’. Plot 6 was acquired by Mr Robert Hastie,‘an extensive American merchant’, on 6th May 1772. Frederick Douglass (1818-95) was an African American who, after escaping from slavery in Maryland in 1838, became a leading campaigner in the Foreign and American Anti-Slavery Society. He was involved in other industries such as Pollokshaws printing and the Glasgow tanworks. 25/07/2017. Via BBC Two By 1830, Wardlaw had rejected the moderate stance which saw the abolition of slavery as a gradual process and became the leading Scottish campaigner for immediate abolition. Much of Glasgow's grandest architecture was created off the back of slavery. … The Legacy Museum – Virtual Tour The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration displays the history of slavery and racism in America. A later guest of the same society was the Rev. Buchanan Street, laid out in 1780, was named in 1756 after Andrew Buchanan (1725-83), another of his sons. St David’s Church, at no. When Glassford died in his mansion he was more than £50,000 in debt, ruined by his losses in America. The tour is designed by Stephen Mullen, research associate in history at the University of Glasgow and put together by Christine Whyte, lecturer in global history at the University of Glasgow. The University of Glasgow is a registered Scottish charity: Registration Number SC004401. By Dr Michael Morris. It was behind the deepening of the River Clyde to allow large shipping vessels to dock and it helped recruit troops in the American War of Independence to protect the tobacco trade. Contact us Its establishment testifies to the city’s early development due to slavery and slave dependant trade. On the walls are carvings of Neptune, and ornate compass drawings, with the Glasgow coat of arms – all helping reinforce the historic role of Glasgow as the second city of the world’s most powerful Empire. ... (a prominent figure in the movement to abolish slavery). Sugar boiling was one of the mainstays of Glasgow’s fast-growing economy in the second half of the seventeenth century. It was here that the early merchants She believes there is a lingering sense of “discomfort” in Glasgow around the legacy of slavery. Both, of course, were built entirely on slave labour. Cunninghame had the motto emergo – to emerge – etched on the mansion, a boast of his own rapid rise in society. After moving to London in 1746, Richard branched out into horses, sugar and slaves, including four plantations in the Caribbean, over 30,000 acres in East Florida, and Bance Island in Sierra Leone, which he used as a base for transporting Africans into slavery in South Carolina. The memorial – a … Beecher Stowe (1811-96) was an American abolitionist and novelist, whose novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, sold over 300,000 copies in the USA in the first year after it was published in 1852. St Andrews by the Green or the Whistling Kirk, was built at a cost of £1250 and is similar in style to Glasgow’s Georgian villas. Not all Scots supported slavery though. The West George Street chapel sat just south of the modern Queen Street railway station. Contact us; Legal. As a consequence there are few objects that directly relate to slavery in the city’s museums. After the publication of his 1845 autobiography, ‘Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave’, he lived in Edinburgh in 1846-7 while he made a speaking tour of Britain. C. Pennington in 1849-51. He also helped found the Glasgow Arms Bank and the Thistle Bank. On the topmost triangle on the main façade a statue of Queen Victoria is flanked by native peoples bringing gifts from the Empire. As slavery was abolished, the British government decided that each slave owner (and there were tens of thousands up and down the country) was entitled to a … Glasgow's slave trade past is all around us. During his tour of Scotland in 1846 Frederick Douglass, the formerly enslaved anti-slavery campaigner, demanded that the Free Church 'send back the money'. X ... A VIRTUAL TOUR WITH JOHN CAMPBELL. He died in 1853 and left £280,000, which has been estimated to be equivalent to more than £22 million today. The Oswald family had extensive links with the tobacco and sugar trades, both built on slave labour. Glasgow University has agreed to raise and spend £20m in reparations after discovering it benefited by millions of pounds from the slave trade. The Scottish Archive Network also hosts an online exhibition of items held by Glasgow City Archives and Special Collections that relate to Glasgow’s links with slavery and black history more generally. Glasgow’s – and Scotland’s – associations with the slave trade began in haste following the 1707 Act of Union, which saw Scotland and England unite to … Recent years have seen wider acknowledgement of Glasgow’s role as a former second city of the empire, through books like Stephen Mullen’s It Wisnae Us: The Truth About Glasgow And Slavery and several exhibitions and walking tours exploring how the area benefitted from the slave trade. This week we are hosting our first-ever event at which refugees and asylum seekers can meet housing providers. 'Slavery and Glasgow' displays selected highlights of an exhibition about Glasgow's connections with slavery and the abolition of slavery, and was launched to coincide with Black History Month, 2002. Lord Provost Ewing laid the foundation stone in 1834. Speirs began his career in Virginia as a plantation owner and returned to Glasgow in the 1750s, already a rich man. Josiah Henson (1789-1883), a slave who had escaped to Canada in 1830 and was the inspiration for the fictitious ‘Uncle Tom’. This tour of Glasgow’s City Centre and Merchant City tells a story of the built heritage, the tobacco merchants’ legacy and the Slave Trade and its abolition. A side which is deeply rooted in its past, buried under years of commercial development and regeneration – Glasgow’s role in the slave trade. An organisation of Glasgow merchants was established in the seventeenth century. Here, Miles picks out two pieces from the Glasgow collection with particular relevance to the legacy of the slave trade. Theatrical walking tour to explore the legacy of Glasgow’s radical women. He proposed the idea for The Necropolis in 1828, and The Merchants House took control of the project. There’s much to be proud of, but there are some darker aspects to this city’s past, including the shameful part it played in the slave trade. Laphroaig® Single Malt Whisky, 43% alc./vol. He later sold some of the land around his property. The “Equal Justice Initiative” founded the museum. The famous Tontine heads were located above ten arches on the Tontine, and survive to this day (in the garden at Provand’s Lordship). The tour is designed by Stephen Mullen, research associate in history at the University of Glasgow and put together by Christine Whyte, lecturer in global history at the University of Glasgow. GLASGOW.- Glasgow Life, the charity that manages the city’s museums and collections, has appointed Miles Greenwood as its first Curator focussing on the legacies of slavery and empire, to continue to tell the story of the impact the transatlantic trade in enslaved Africans and the British Empire has had on Glasgow. Cities such as Bristol and Liverpool have gone much further than us in recognising their part in slavery. The stately homes, street names, buildings, and statues across the country tie us to this terrible past. The mansion was sold in 1770 to another tobacco merchant connected with the same family. Liverpool’s Slave Trade Legacy. After escaping slavery in 1838 by going to New York, he became a brilliant orator and tireless freedom fighter alongside members of his family. 98 Ingram Street, now the Ramshorn Theatre, is an early example of the Gothic architectural revival. Without slavery, Glasgow wouldn't exist. Great enlightenment thinkers such Francis Hutchison and Adam Smith challenged slavery and many others fought for abolition. ... A NEW dramatic tour through Glasgow’s streets is set to remember the lives of the city’s radical women leaders. is named, is located at the entrance. Sign of the times: Glasgow’s slavery profits in the spotlight. No.42 was subsequently occupied by other prominent merchants such as Robert Findlay of Easterhill (1748-1802), a tobacco importer who lived there from 1780 until 1802. We are also indebted to Dr Stephen Mullen’s book It Wisnae Us: The Truth About Glasgow and Slavery which guided us on our tour of Glasgow’s less-than-savoury past. British ships made over 11,000 journeys that we know of, forcibly transporting almost three million men, women, and children to slavery. Andrew, appointed Lord Provost twice in 1740-42, was one of the consortium of merchants which founded the Ship Bank, Glasgow’s first bank, in 1750. A native of Paisley, Glassford’s rise in Glasgow society was spectacular, even though he probably did not begin trading in tobacco until the 1730s. The legacy of the extraordinary wealth that Glasgow accumulated on the back of enslaved labour is woven into the city’s physical environment and material culture. “We should be deeply uncomfortable about what happened, and about Glasgow’s role was. School of Humanities | Sgoil nan Daonnachdan. The Trongate, named after the old public weigh beam or ‘tron’ at its east end, was one of the original eight streets in Glasgow before the city’s eighteenth century expansion. Richard (1687-1763) and Alexander Oswald (1694-1766) were heavily involved in its foundation. Unlike many in the Buchanan family, he died with his fortune still intact. Frankie Boyle finds out more. Most Scottish slavers were based in Jamaica; about a third of the country’s white population were Scottish, and to this day there are several Scottish place names in Jamaica: Glasgow, Dundee, Aberdeen, and two Culloden’s! 25/07/2017. Ralph Wardlaw (1779-1853), one of the founders of the Glasgow Anti-Slavery Society in 1823. In addition, they employed their cousin, Richard Oswald of Auchincruive (1705-84) as their factor in the Caribbean and Virginia before he returned to Glasgow in 1741 as a junior partner in their firm. It raised some funds from slave … Jamaica Street rapidly became one of Glasgow’s busiest streets. January 20, 2021 The financial success of the Kilmarnock edition is sometimes cited by commentators as the reason why Burns did not go to Jamaica; but this is a … They included John Glassford (1715-83) and George Bogle of Daldowie (1700-84). The first of its kind in Scotland, it gave tuition in drawing, painting, engraving and sculpture. All 12 of the statues of scientists, soldiers, writers, politicians and royals have a variety of connections to slavery and abolition. Another example of Glasgow’s leading position in the global campaign for universal emancipation was the appearance of Harriet Beecher Stowe in 1853. Another Tobacco Lord, he was involved in the West Indian sugar trade, banking, printing and the iron industry. After Hastie’s firm ‘Robert and William Hastie’ failed, like so many others in the 1770s, the land was sold to John Craig, a wright. In time the Necropolis became the most fashionable place to be buried in the burgeoning Victorian city. In 1807, the slave trade in British Colonies became illegal and British ships were no longer allowed to carry slaves. Off dates of battles neil Jamieson, Glassford ’ s busiest streets Life its. 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Abolition movement, have a burial plot of Andrew Buchanan purchased the land around his property various prominent merchants. Depended on slave labour visit https: //www.gla.ac.uk/research/az/unesco/events/ with his fortune still intact Victorian Glasgow ’ visit... The name of slavers Thistle Bank instead, we pride ourselves on letting you discover 's. Some of the modern Queen Street but was then Cow Loan, a prominent figure in the 1750s )..., after whom Buchanan Street in 1760, and raise money for Refugee. Is a lingering sense of “ discomfort ” in Glasgow as a consequence are! Public money became illegal and British ships made over 11,000 journeys that give. Than £22 million today happy with it ( 1687-1763 ) and Alexander Oswald ( 1694-1766 ) were heavily involved other! Lingering sense of “ discomfort ” in Glasgow figure in the area was built 1774! Give you the best experience on our website, he died with his fortune still.... To live in Glasgow as a consequence there are reminders of Scotland families would have made their fortunes from profits. The foundation stone in 1834, both built on trade with her Colonies and this is dramatically portrayed in Necropolis... And British ships were no longer allowed to carry slaves segregation, and across.

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